Home > access, advocacy, learning, policy > Don’t Let Google Close the Book on Reader Privacy

Don’t Let Google Close the Book on Reader Privacy

Google, Inc.
Image via Wikipedia

Google is poised to radically expand its book service, monitoring the digital books you search, the pages you read, how long you spend on various pages, and even what you write down in the margins. Google could then combine your reading habits with other information it has about you from other Google services, creating a massive “digital dossier” about you, your interests, and your concerns. With numerous reports of government efforts to compel online and offline booksellers to turn over records about readers, the time is now for Google to pledge to protect reader privacy.

You shouldn’t be forced to pay for digital books with your privacy. Tell Google it needs to develop a robust privacy policy that gives you at least as much privacy in books online as you have in your neighborhood library or bookstore. Google must:

* Protect your reading records from government and third party fishing expeditions by responding only to properly-issued warrants and court orders, and by letting you know if someone has demanded access to information Google has collected about you.

* Make sure that you can still browse and read anonymously by not forcing you to register or give personal information and by deleting any logging information for all services after a maximum of 30 days.

* Separate data related to Google Book Search from any other information the company collects about you, unless you give it express permission.

* Give you the ability to edit and delete any information collected about you, transfer books from one account to another without tracking, and hide your “bookshelves” or other reading lists from others with access to your computer.

* Keep Google Book Search information private from third parties like credit card processors, book publishers, and advertisers.

via Electronic Frontier Foundation:.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Categories: access, advocacy, learning, policy Tags:
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.